<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:garamond,serif"><p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><b><span style="font-size:14pt">Call
for Volume: Media, Development and Democracy: historical and current
connections</span></b></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><b><span style="font-size:14pt">Editor:
Heloisa Pait</span></b></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><b><span style="font-size:14pt">Deadline:
December 15, 2019</span></b></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"> </p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Connections between the emergence
of national democracies, economic development, and the introduction of mass
media have been studied for many decades, but there are still missing links in
this complex web. In 1949, Daniel Lerner suggested the existence of a
relationship between new media and the modern mentality in developing nations.
Although much criticized, his insights influenced optimistic views of the
impact of television and the internet around the globe. Here we ask a different
question: what is the impact of State censorship and material restrictions on
the press, in countries that have been witnessing continuous economic
development?</p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"> </p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Do restrictions on the functioning
of the media in the formative period of a nation have long-term impacts on
economic development? Looking from a different angle, can a limited labor
market, with few formal vacancies in competitive firms, make literacy less
rewarding, discouraging private investment in education? How do low literacy
rates influence political culture and the nature of the public sphere in a
modern society? In this volume, we would like to examine the multiple
relationships between economic development, adoption of new media, literacy and
education, and democratic culture.</p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"> </p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">We are interested in studies of
so-called developing countries, and in particular those where there have been
restrictions on the printing press, such as colonial Brazil and the Ottoman
Empire, or which somehow differ from the Northern European and North American
model of media development. We welcome papers using a variety of methods,
particularly those bridging interdisciplinary gaps. Our goal is to point to new
paths in the understanding of the challenges to achieving a free and just
society. We welcome papers that discuss public policy regarding educational or
economic reforms within that larger investigative framework, as well as
research on the experience of particular groups. Research is particularly
welcome on women, the African diaspora, and/or Marranos.</p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"> </p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">The article “Liberalism Without a
Press: 18th Century Minas Geraes and the Roots of Brazilian Development”, by
the editor, which appeared on volume 18 of Studies in Media and Communications,
further elaborates on the possible relations between media, development and the
public sphere. Please send your inquiries to Dr. Heloisa Pait, <a href="mailto:heloisa.pait@fulbrightmail.org" target="_blank">heloisa.pait@fulbrightmail.org</a> with the
subject “Emerald Book Series”. Submissions should be sent before January 15,
2020.</p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"> </p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Editor: Heloisa Pait is a tenured
professor of sociology at the São Paulo State University Julio de Mesquita
Filho. She has written on Brazilian telenovelas, on the role of new media in
political action and on higher education in Brazil and in the United States.
Heloisa Pait is an active participant of public debates; she has recently
launched Revista Pasmas, an online women’s magazine. Her published articles are
listed in the Lattes platform at <a href="http://www.bit.ly/helopaitLattes" target="_blank">www.bit.ly/helopaitLattes</a>.</p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"> </p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt;font-size:11pt;font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Contributing editor: Renata
Nagamine is a postdoctoral fellow in the Graduate Program in International
Relations at the Federal University of Bahia, Brazil. She received her PhD in
international law from the University of São Paulo Law School. Nagamine has
worked as a researcher at the Brazilian Centre of Analysis and Planning
(Cebrap) and was a Kathleen Fitzpatrick Visiting Fellow with the Laureate
Program in International Law at the University of Melbourne in 2018. Her areas of
interest are international humanitarian law, human rights, and political
theory.Her published articles are listed in the Lattes platform at <a href="http://lattes.cnpq.br/" target="_blank">http://lattes.cnpq.br</a>.
 </p>

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