<div dir="ltr"><div>Hello, friends.<br><br>The deadline for submissions to HICSS has been extended to July 15. The conference is still "on" for January, assuming that travel is possible at the start of the year. In any case, proceedings from HICSS are very highly cited. While we are certainly in a period of flux, I hope you will consider submitting and (hopefully) coming together in the new year.</div><div><br></div><div>In particular, we hope you will consider submitting to our mini-track for Digital Methods:</div><a href="https://hicss.hawaii.edu/tracks-54/digital-and-social-media/#digital-methods-minitracks">https://hicss.hawaii.edu/tracks-54/digital-and-social-media/#digital-methods-minitracks</a> <div><br>There has been an explosion of research using social media data to study human behavior and social interaction in almost every domain of social science. While the body of literature using digital and social media data is growing at a staggering rate, accompanying methodological contributions about the process of conducting research with digital and social media data remains thin. The existing methodological literature is typically tool or technology driven, and not a result of empirical examination of the data collection process.This leaves researchers without an understanding of how to approach or evaluate the social media data collection process, and in turn, how to appropriately interpret findings from this type of research. As a result, researchers, practitioners, and students are left to continually reinvent the wheel by learning through a process of trial and error.<br><br>This minitrack addresses this gap by providing a venue to discuss methodological issues and approaches to conducting research with digital and social media data. We welcome papers related to methodological challenges for researchers including, but not limited to: (1) the need for new methods for data collection and analysis, (2) adaptations of existing methods (3) issues of representation and sampling, (4) ephemerality of social media data, (5) holistic collection of digital social media data and associated content such as images/URLs/video, (6) preservation, archiving, and data sharing, and (7) impact of changing platform affordances, interfaces, designs, and APIs.<br><br></div><div><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_signature" data-smartmail="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">Best,<br></div><div dir="ltr"><br></div><div dir="ltr">Alex</div><div dir="ltr"><br></div><div dir="ltr">-- </div><div dir="ltr">// Alexander Halavais    (he/him)      @halavais       <a href="http://alex.halavais.net/bio" target="_blank">alex.halavais.net/bio</a>        </div><div dir="ltr">// Associate Prof. of Critical Data Studies - Director of MA in Social Tech</div><div dir="ltr">// Arizona State University,  New College,  Social & Behavioral Sciences</div><div dir="ltr">// "I want to see you not through the Machine," said Kuno. "I want to </div><div dir="ltr">// speak to you not through the wearisome Machine."</div><div><br></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div>